The World’s Tallest Mountain from Base to Peak

The World’s Tallest Mountain from Base to Peak
October 02, 2012

No, it’s not the Mount Everest, but the Mount McKinley (or Denali) in Alaska !

McKinley has a summit elevation of 20,320 feet (6,194 m) above sea level, making it the highest peak in North America. Measured from base to peak, it is the world’s tallest mountain ON LAND. McKinley sits atop a plain with elevations from 300 metres (1,000 ft) to 900 metres (3,000 ft), for a base-to-peak height of 5,300 to 5,900 metres (17,000 to 19,000 ft).

Mount Everest, on the other hand, sits atop the Tibetan Plateau at a much higher base elevation. Base elevations for Everest range from 4,200 m (13,800 ft) on the south side to 5,200 m (17,100 ft) on the Tibetan Plateau, for a base-to-peak height in the range of 3,650 to 4,650 metres (12,000 to 15,300 ft).

But the world’s tallest mountain ON EARTH (Land and Ocean) is the volcano Mauna Kea. Standing 4,205 m (13,796 ft) above sea level, its peak is the highest point in the U.S. state of Hawaii. However, much of the mountain is below sea level; when measured from its oceanic base, the total height difference is 10,200 m (33,500 ft). McKinley’s base-to-peak height is only little more than half that of the 10,200 metres (33,500 ft).

  • Najeeb Ullah

    I think it is Raka poshi In Gilgit-Baltistan in Pakistan That rises 5800 meters from the valley floor. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rakaposhi

  • Mike Johnson

    Nanga Parbat and Aconcogua look awesome and large from base up. Needs to be an official technical survey from the base – defined as when one begins ascent – and the summit

  • tr4head .

    i cant navigate the damn web page because of the stupid ass popups

  • Zubair Hussain

    @creature – you are spot on. It is Rakaposhi. Next is McKinley which is about 5500m.

  • goblin072 .

    Wow, Everest is puny vs Denali. As far as viewing it Danali wins hands down.

  • Michelle Bovee Knittle

    Raka Poshi rises 5,800 meters. Denali, on its tallest side, rises 5,900 meters.